Join us as we examine one of our vintage finds from the 2014 Greystone Mansion Concours d’Elegance…

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Stunningly beautiful in every aspect, this 1935 Bugatti was an absolute crowd-pleaser at this year’s show.

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We must have circled back to this roadster five or six times, waiting for the crowd to clear so we could get a few great shots of this Bugatti.

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Some cars are great from afar but not up close, and some have wonderful detail but aren’t that impressive from afar.  This Bugatti’s craftsmanship and design is astounding from both near and far.

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Owner Jim Hull of Los Angeles provides additional details about his vehicle.  The Electron Torpedo 57 SC is a competition model, and this one-off was a prototype of the Bugatti 57 SC series.

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It was shown only once in 1935 at the Paris Auto Salon, alongside its sister, the Aerolithe Electron Coupe, a forerunner of the Atlantic Coupes.

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Both were competition models with lightweight magnesium alloy bodies (then referred to as Electron).

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The original Electron body was missing when found, a likely casualty of the 1940s WWII German occupation of the French Bugatti factory.

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This Torpedo features a new body, which was recreated according to original specifications, on an authentic gondola curving chassis.

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The entire body was constructed without the use of welding, as would have been the practice in the 1930s for this vehicle, which leaves us to enjoy the gorgeous rivet work throughout the body.

The in-depth story behind this car is absolutely worth checking out!  We do hope to catch this one out on the track one day soon (crossing our fingers for Laguna Seca, this summer!).

 

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