Without a doubt, the cars that enter the Concours d’Elegance each year are incredibly stunning.  From the rare to the unique, they are cars rarely seen out on today’s roads, and many of them reside in museums and private showrooms around the world.  Each car, in its own way, is a showstopper at this event, making it difficult for one to stand out in a stellar crowd of approximately 250 vehicles.  Yet this car seemed to be the talk of the lawn this year, and for good reason…

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The Pebble Beach Concours Car Guide provides us with more details about this one-of-a-kind beauty.  “After taking control of Ford Motor Company from his father Edsel Ford in 1945, Henry Ford II was anxious to bring the company into the modern era.

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The Lincoln-Zephyr and Cosmopolitan were obvious examples of this new direction, but this much more radical car was ordered for the 1955 Turin Motor Show.

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At the time, many Italian coachbuilders were forming alliances with the American motor companies, which had deeper pockets.

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Ford turned to Felice Mario Boano to design and build the Lincoln Indianapolis and his son, Gian Paolo Boano, carried out the work.

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After its Turin debut Henry Ford II used it for a time, and later it is believed that he gave it to his friend Errol Flynn.

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A thorough restoration was started in 2002, utilizing Boano’s original designs.

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It is finished in its original bright orange paint with a black-and-white checkered interior.”

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We first caught a glimpse of this Boano exclusive study at the Tour d’Elegance just days prior to the Concours.  Resting under a shady tree, it was difficult to photograph properly, but that didn’t take away from its striking look.

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The story behind this Lincoln is filled with rumor and mystery.  It is said that Henry Ford II gave the car away because he was frustrated with the lack of quality of the vehicle, which, supposedly, was rushed in order to meet the deadline for the Turin Motor Show.

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After Errol Flynn’s supposed ownership, the Indianapolis reportedly changed hands several times, finally ending up somewhat abandoned in one owner’s shed.

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It is also rumored that a fire destroyed portions of the interior, which had to be carefully recreated during the restoration process.

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It has been said that many unusual problems were tended to during the restoration process, including recreating the hood, which had been crafted from spare oil cans.

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Jim Cox of Sussex Motor and Coachworks directed this restoration, with the instructions to restore the vehicle in the manner that Boano himself would do, if he had the time.  The result?  A gorgeous Italian inspired vehicle that further propelled ford into the modern era.

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Photo Credit

The car is currently in the collection of Paul & Judy Andrews of Forth Worth, Texas.  Anyone with a spare two or three million can enter the bidding for this rare vehicle, as it will be up for sale through RM Auctions on November 21st.  The last time this car was up for auction in 2006, it fetched $1,375,000.

Right now, we’re wishing for a winning lottery ticket to come our way within the next month or so…

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